heller:

Don’t write about people doing cool stuff. Only do cool stuff that people want to write about.


this girl is sad, because writing is pain

EVENT: Historical Fiction/Fictional History: A Conversation About Storytelling
Academic history writing can often be stale, discourse-laden and esoteric, and some of the best fiction writers avoid historical topics out of fear that they might be swept up in the politics of writing about the past. Meanwhile, the undeniable public appetite for books related to historical topics has been left to be satiated by journalists and political pundits who often write history to advance their own agendas.
This event aims to bring together writers of history with writers of fiction to discuss how we develop stories. We will address the following questions: What can historians learn from fiction writers about constructing historical narratives? What can fiction writers learn from historians about representation, authenticity and honoring the past? How can we make high-level history writing palatable and engaging for a variety of audiences? How can we inject high-level historical content into great fiction? 
We’ll start with a casual conversation over beers on Tuesday, July 29th, 5-7 pm at 615 N. Fairview Drive, with snacks and cold beers provided.

this girl is sad, because writing is pain

EVENT: Historical Fiction/Fictional History: A Conversation About Storytelling

Academic history writing can often be stale, discourse-laden and esoteric, and some of the best fiction writers avoid historical topics out of fear that they might be swept up in the politics of writing about the past. Meanwhile, the undeniable public appetite for books related to historical topics has been left to be satiated by journalists and political pundits who often write history to advance their own agendas.

This event aims to bring together writers of history with writers of fiction to discuss how we develop stories. We will address the following questions: What can historians learn from fiction writers about constructing historical narratives? What can fiction writers learn from historians about representation, authenticity and honoring the past? How can we make high-level history writing palatable and engaging for a variety of audiences? How can we inject high-level historical content into great fiction? 

We’ll start with a casual conversation over beers on Tuesday, July 29th, 5-7 pm at 615 N. Fairview Drive, with snacks and cold beers provided.


What’s better than cheap beer and good friends? #summercommune by summercommune

What’s better than cheap beer and good friends? #summercommune by summercommune


Sand Mandala by summercommune

Sand Mandala by summercommune


A little time to relax in the summer home of the Dali Lama. by summercommune

A little time to relax in the summer home of the Dali Lama. by summercommune


At #ignite with a summer communer @carriewakeham giving a talk on foreign aid by summercommune

At #ignite with a summer communer @carriewakeham giving a talk on foreign aid by summercommune


IGNITE BLOOMINGTON 12 is this Thursday at the Bloomington Playwright’s Project. 20 slides & 5 minutes of awesomeness, featuring Communers Josh & Carrie.


In 2013, a report by the Washington, DC-based Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) showed how badly the U.S. lags behind Europe when it comes to paid vacation time. CEPR reported that 77% of private-sector companies in the U.S. voluntarily offered their employees at least some paid vacation time (with 21 days off being the average), but the U.S. has no federal law mandating any time off. And that’s quite a contrast to Europe: CEPR reported that government-mandated paid vacation time in Europe includes 35 days off in Austria, 31 days off in Italy and France, 34 days off in Germany and Spain, 30 days off in Belgium and 29 days off in the Republic of Ireland.

We’re havin’ a tech week!

Innovation doesn’t just happen in Silicon Valley, so in the Summer Commune spirit we wanted to showcase Bloomington’s already vibrant tech scene. 

Summer Commune isn’t a tech company, though I guess the idea did germinate from a blog post. While we do have a file cabinet full of criticisms about the current state of technology, we find a few things particularly exciting about what happens in the tech world. The tech companies who are having a major impact on the world are the ones who aim for disruption: crowdsourcing capital, freeing information, and making catching a lift uber convenient. Summer Commune shares kinship with these organizations in our desire to radically reimagine and transform our daily lives for the better. 

That famous internet cat already travels across the same communication lines as inflammatory political ideologies. If we want to make sure that our progressive visions for the future are not tuned out, we need to fully understand and build frameworks to amplify the stories that we want to tell. So please join us this week for more conversations around technology and the internet. 

On Wednesday evening, Social Media Forum: What’s Cool & What’s Lame About How You Use The Social Internet?  We’re having an open forum about social media led by our most recently arrived communer, Carrie. It’ll be a casual conversation about how people use social media… over a few beers. At our co-working space from 5-7 at 615 N Fairview St.

Later that night we’ll head to 
The Public Hack at Bloominglabs, Bloomington’s own hackerspace to check out their public hack from 7-9. Come build projects, ask questions, teach things, and learn stuff.

On Thursday night at 6pm join us at Ignite Bloominton 12, an event where presenters give impassioned 5 minute talk over 20 slides that automatically advance after 15 seconds. There will be talks about The Stories that Shape our Lives, Cross-Cultural Mis-Communications, and How To Start A Summer Commune. 

And at the end of the week we’re eschewing technology for a good old fashioned campout.

See you there!
-JH


Summer Commune visits the farm. by summercommune

Summer Commune visits the farm. by summercommune